In the end someone else may ultimately buy Anadarko in a bidding war  but I think this explains why Chevron has not drilled some of their leased property in Ohio.  I think they were saving their capital for this bid and maybe if it goes through they will go in another direction and not drill some of their currently leased property. Anyone have any thoughts?

Last week Chevron sent ripples through the oil industry by agreeing to buy Anadarko in the sixth-largest oil and gas deal in history.

Chevron agreed to pay $65 per share of Anadarko, which was a 39% premium to Anadarko's last closing price prior to the deal's announcement. Chevron's outlay will be $33 billion plus assumption of Anadarko's $17 billion debt for a total cost to Chevron of $50 billion.

Anadarko has an attractive global portfolio, but there were several synergies that made it especially attractive for Chevron. The key to this deal is the promise of the Permian Basin, which is now the world's top oil-producing region.

As Chevron points out, the deal connects several of its existing fields to create a 75-mile-wide corridor in the Permian Basin. Connected acreage allows for drilling of longer laterals, enabling a producer to extract more oil from a well, which in turn drives down the cost per barrel.

Chevron was already one of the top acreage holders in the Permian. This acquisition boosts Chevron's acreage by 240,000 net acres to over 1.4 million net acres in the Delaware Basin, where shale oil economics are probably the best in the country.

One additional synergy for Chevron is that they hadn't been a major player in the midstream space, which involves the transport and storage of oil and gas. This deal gives Chevron a 55% stake in Western Midstream Partners, a publicly-traded $16 billion master limited partnership.

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